First Lady of New Jersey, Mary Pat Christie, Joins with Excelsior Medical to help Recareer Veterans and Transitioning Military

On May 13th, Excelsior Medical will be hosting a recareering event with the First Lady of New Jersey, Mary Pat Christie, at their Neptune headquarters for transitioning military and veterans. Partnering with the MedTech and BioTech Veterans Program (MPV) and several other medical device manufacturing companies, the workshop will include job skills training, engagement with mentors from the industry, and an opportunity to meet with hiring managers from participating companies that are looking to fill positions with participating veterans and transitioning military. You can read the press release about the event here: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/excelsior-medical-host-innovative-job-120000522.html

The May 13 event at Excelsior will be held from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at 1933 Heck Ave. in Neptune, NJ, and will include:

* An overview of Excelsior Medical

* An overview of the medical technology and biotechnology industries, including career opportunities

* Mentoring and small-group sessions with Kevin Callahan

* Panel on the medical device industry

* Working groups on resume writing, digital networking, in-person networking, and interview skills

* Information about how to stay connected with MVP

A quote from Excelsior CEO Steve Thornton:  “Veterans are people who want to make a difference. That doesn’t stop when they leave the military. Our gratitude to them shouldn’t stop then, either. We are very pleased to be part of this innovative effort to bring more veterans into the civilian workforce.”

The Excelsior Medical event follows the very successful first MVP Recareering event that was conducted at Ethicon in Somerville on April 29th. At that event, 15 veterans participated in the daylong seminar and within a week three were interviewing for positions and others are in the employment process. The CEO of Johnson and Johnson, Alex Gorsky, personally addressed the group and the day culminated with the J&J Talent Acquision Team mentoring participants about the careers available within the family of J&J companies. You can read about that event here: http://www.mycentraljersey.com/article/20140430/NJCARING/304300040/Career-program-Bridgewater-lets-veterans-realize-their-value-civilian-life

There are a total of 20 seats for veterans at the Excelsior Medical event on May 13th, and slots are still available. Preregistration is necessary to secure a seat in the recareering workshop. Honorably discharged veterans and those still serving are eligible to participate. To preregister, please follow this link: http://www.mvpvets.org/mvpvets-event-interest-form

 

 

 

Helping New Jersey’s Veterans Find Jobs: Recareering Event at Excelsior Medical on May 13th

New Jersey has over 463,000 veterans in the state, and unfortunately it has the dubious honor of having the highest unemployment rate for veterans in the country. According to information released by the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the state had an unemployment rate for veterans of 10.8 percent in 2013.

Fortunately, there are some great companies that are eager to hire veterans.  Not because of a sense of pity, but instead because they recognize the remarkable value that someone who has served in uniform brings to their ranks; someone who will show up on time, knows how to lead and how to follow, how to effectively function in diverse and challenging environments, and the dozens of other traits that every veteran or transitioning military person has inculcated through their service.

Excelsior Medical is one such company.  On May 13th they will be hosting a daylong recareering workshop for transitioning military and veterans.  There is no cost to veterans and meals and parking are included.  The event will include one-on-0ne mentoring with veterans who already work at the hosting company as well as human resources experts and hiring managers who will work with the veterans to improve their resumes, refine job-seeking skills like interviewing and effective social networking, and to interview qualified veterans for jobs. Space is limited to 20 veterans at Excelsior Medical on May 13th.

To register and reserve a seat at the event, follow this link  http://www.mvpvets.org/mvpvets-event-interest-form or go to the MedTech and BioTech Veterans Program website at www.mvpvets.org and follow the “Mentor and Veteran Workshop” link under “events”.

The Drawdown Hits Home

Yesterday I had the great fortune to run into a Marine that I had the pleasure to work with while I was still on active duty.  The young sergeant, who had served honorably and faithfully for eight years and through three wartime deployments, shared with me that despite his overwhelming desire to stay in uniform and continue to serve the nation that he was being forced out of the Marine Corps.  Not because of anything he did – in fact just the opposite.  He was forced out because he loved what he was doing, but because of his success and the successes of countless thousands of others in uniform the need for so many Marines (and Soldiers and Sailors and Airmen) has diminished.  With the end of our active wars overseas comes the end of the need for the large military that had fought them, and with then of the need for so many uniformed military men and women comes the need to shrink the force.

That need is why such a talented, motivated, professional, and dedicated Marine NCO is being shown the door.  Along with thousands and thousands of professionals just like him.

Earlier in the week I attended an event in which LtGen John Toolan, the Commanding General of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, shared his personal dilemma in regards to the downsizing of the military.  His command, which has been on the absolute tip of the spear in Iraq and Afghanistan (having had elements ranging from platoons to divisions deployed to both theaters), is facing the practical realities of a contracting military.  He had over 4000 re-enlistment requests sitting on his desk (not really sitting there, but awaiting action from his headquarters) from Marines who want to continue to serve.

He only had the authority to approve 400 of them.

The effect of the reduction in forces is that one in ten Marines who want to stay in and continue to serve are able to do so.  The other nine are headed out the door to a future that does not include the career that they had anticipated.  Those nine are headed back into the society they served, and they will all need jobs once they arrive.

Josef Stalin once said that one death is a tragedy and one million is a statistic.  In the context of a career that is cut short by a shrinking military his words are strikingly relevant nearly a century after he uttered them.  One serviceman or servicewoman whose career is ended because of the vicissitudes of DOD force structure is indeed a tragedy because of the unfulfilled future to which they had dedicated their lives, but the tens of thousands who are being pushed out the door are just a statistic.

Edmund Burke also observed that the only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.  If those of us who inhabit the society in which those in uniform will return simply look at the statistics and shrug them off, then we are guilty of failing each and every new veteran and allowing the evil of unemployment and underemployment to befall those who have ensured that our society remains free and unfettered by the shackles of tyranny.

So ask yourself: is the drawdown a cascade of individual tragedies that we can collectively help avert or a statistic that we will collectively ignore, or is there something we can do to make sure that the careers that they were not fulfilled in uniform can be created once they hang up the cloth of the nation?